BuckaRoo Brekkie Loaf

This bread is full of goodness and is a different way to incorporate buckwheat into your diet. The inspiration for this loaf came from a Buckwheat, banana and brazil nut bread recipe by Hanna Sillitoe from her book ‘Radiant’.  I hadn’t thought of using buckwheat in this way before and I was intrigued. My intention was to bake her recipe but I didn’t have any bananas or brazil nuts in the house so I decided to experiment and one thing I do have ALOT of at the moment is rhubarb.   The result is this mix of Buckwheat, Rhubarb, nuts and seeds.

BuckaRoo Brekkie Loaf

buckaroo loaf2

  • 150g Buckwheat groats
  • 1 tablespoon rapeseed oil (or coconut or olive oil)
  •    Pinch Salt
  •   100g pitted dates – chopped
  • 150g mix of nuts and seeds (I used almonds, hazelnuts, pumpkin and sunflower seeds)
  • 2 tablespoons chia seeds
  • 2 tablespoons flax seeds
  • 180g Rhubarb
  •   1 tablespoon coconut palm sugar
  •   100g oats
  • 1 teaspoon cinnamon
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup

Method

  • Line a 450g loaf tin with baking paper.
  • Wash the buckwheat and put into a pan with enough water to cover, a pinch of salt and 1 tablespoon of rapeseed oil. Bring to the boil and then simmer for 15 minutes.  Check the water – I needed to add a bit more during cooking to stop it sticking.  Drain off any excess water and leave to cool.
  • Cut the rhubarb into thin sticks (1cm thick and approx. 7cm long – check they fit into your loaf tin width ways) and toss with the coconut palm sugar.
  • In a food processor blitz the dates, nuts and seeds, chia and flax seeds, oats and cinnamon until well combined. Add the buckwheat and maple syrup and blend until combined.  The dough will be dry and coarse but will squish together.
  • Line the bottom of the tin with half the sticks of rhubarb, then add half the bread mixture. Lay the other half of the rhubarb sticks on top. Finally add the rest of the bread mixture and firm down.
  • Bake 180c/350f/Gas 4 for 40 minutes.
  • Leave to cool slightly in the tin before removing and letting it cool completely.

Delicious with almond butter and banana.  Also nice with a dollop of yoghurt on top.

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Rhubarb & Ginger Scones

With a bumper crop of rhubarb still growing on the allotment and some time to bake – this mornings rather decadent breakfast was scones. Scones definitely work for breakfast, especially if they include fruit, however I didn’t think I could face the full cream tea so early in the day.  Instead I had my scones with coconut yoghurt and some stewed rhubarb.  I used Coyo Yoghurt which is thick and perfect as a healthy clotted cream substitute.  Happy bank holiday!

Rhubarb & Ginger Scones (makes about 6-8 scones)

Rhubarb and ginger scones

  • 270g self raising flour
  • pinch salt
  • 50g caster sugar
  • 50g unsalted butter – cold from the fridge and cut into small cubes
  • 1 egg
  • 1 tablespoon natural yoghurt
  • 80ml milk
  • A thumb size (or a bit larger) piece of fresh ginger (peeled)
  • 100g raw rhubarb (diced)
  • Extra flour for rolling out

Method

  • Sift the flour, salt and sugar into a bowl. Add the diced butter and rub in using your fingers until the mixture looks like fine breadcrumbs.
  • Stir in the diced rhubarb.
  • Blend the ginger, milk and yoghurt together in a blender.  Then beat in the egg.  Add this wet mixture to the dry using a flat palate knife and bring to a dough.  The dough should be wet but not really sticky.  If it is, then add a tiny bit more flour to take the stickiness off.
  • Turn the dough onto a floured surface and knead for a few seconds, then pat out the dough (or gently roller).  Cut out rounds of the dough (about 3-4cm thick).
  • Put on a baking tray (with some baking paper to stop any scones sticking). Sprinkle some flour over the top of the scones.
  • Bake for 15 minutes at 220c/425f/Gas 7.  The scones should look light brown on top and on the bottom, and sound hollow when you tap them on the bottom. Cool on a rack.

rhubarb and ginger scones all

Rhubarb, Ginger & Cardamom Porridge

Yesterday I picked my first stick of rhubarb from the allotment. I have 3 plants and they are all growing really well again this year, so lots of rhubarb ahead for me and lots of experimenting to be done.  This porridge is really simple and made in one pot – no extra stewing or cooking of rhubarb.  You can vary the sugar based on your preference or leave it out completely for a slightly sharper taste.  Personally I love porridge with a bit (sometimes a lot) of demerara.

Rhubarb, ginger & cardamom Porridge (serves one)

rhubarb ginger and cardamom p

 

  • 50g Oats
  • 250ml coconut milk (or other milk)
  • 2 teaspoons demerara sugar
  • 1 stick of rhubarb – diced or cut into small slices.
  • 2 cubes of crystallised ginger – diced finely
  • 1/4 teaspoon ground cardamom
  • Handful of blueberries
  • Extra demerara sugar to sprinkle on top

Put all the ingredients (apart from the blueberries) into a saucepan and bring to the boil.  Simmer for 5 or so minutes until the rhubarb has gone soft and starting to mush into the mixture.  Turn off the heat and stir through the blueberries – this ensures they keep their shape and just soften a tiny bit.

Serve with an extra sprinkle of demerara sugar for that added crunch.

Rhubarb Crumble overnight Oats

We’re coming back into Rhubarb season (for forced rhubarb) and my allotment rhubarb is starting to come back to life.  In anticipation I’m trying to clear my freezer of the batches I froze at the end of last season.  I adore rhubarb, it’s so versatile and quick and easy to cook.  Of course you can’t beat the old favourite that is rhubarb crumble, so here is my healthy breakfast version of overnight oats.

Rhubarb Crumble Overnight Oats (makes 2 portions)

rhubarb-crumble-oats

  • 300g stewed rhubarb
  • 200ml almond milk
  • 1 teaspoon mixed spice
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 100g oats
  • Yoghurt to serve

Topping (makes two portions – although it’s very moreish)

  • Around 10 hazelnuts or almonds (or other nuts of choice)
  • 1 tablespoon pumpkin seeds
  • 2 teaspoons demerara sugar

Method

  • Blend 1/2 the stewed rhubarb with the almond milk, spices and maple syrup. Add this to 100g oats and then stir through the rest of the rhubarb.  Put in the fridge overnight.
  • To make the topping – crush the nuts and seeds in a pestle and mortar and stir through the sugar.

To serve – layer up with yoghurt and sprinkle the topping on top.

Rhubarb Crumble Bowl

Rhubarb crumble for breakfast – our British summer is making me crave comfort foods and who doesn’t love a good crumble.  This is the breakfast version and can be eaten warm or cold perhaps depending upon the weather!

I like a thicker stewed rhubarb for this dish so I stew the rhubarb without any added liquid and just the sugar. It means you have to be vigilant about keeping an eye on it and stirring it to prevent burn.

Rhubarb Crumble Bowl (serves one)

Rhubarb crumble

Rhubarb layer

  • 100g Rhubarb – chopped into small chunks
  • 1 teaspoon of sugar

Put the Rhubarb into a pan, add the sugar and then heat until the rhubarb goes soft and squishy – keep a careful eye on it.  Should take around 3-4 mins depending on the size of your chunks. Leave to cool for a few minutes.

For the crumble topping

  • 20g Oats
  • 1 teaspoon coconut oil
  • 1 teaspoon ground almonds
  • 1 teaspoon desiccated coconut
  • 1 teaspoon flaked almonds
  • 1 teaspoon pumpkin seeds
  • 1 teaspoon sugar (I prefer brown)

Melt the coconut oil in a small frying pan then add the oats and gently cook for a couple of minutes.  Add the rest of the ingredients and continue to gently cook for a further 2 – 3 minutes.  Best left to cool for a few minutes.

Layer into a bowl or glass and top with yoghurt – I love coconut yoghurt with this.

 

Rhubarb Spelt Muffins

A lovely way to use fresh rhubarb. The muffin mixture seems quite dry but the rhubarb releases it’s juices during cooking and these muffins turn out to be surprisingly moist.  You could use other flours, but I think the spelt flour complements the tart rhubarb really well.  These are great on the go breakfast snacks – and freeze really well. They are also fab with some yoghurt or crème fraiche and some extra berries or banana on the side.

rhurbarb muffins

Rhubarb Spelt Muffins

  • 200g raw rhubarb – diced into small pieces
  • 280g Spelt plain flour
  • 3 teaspoons baking powder
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 100g coconut palm sugar
  • 1 teaspoon ground cardamom (about 6 pods)
  • 1 teaspoon ground ginger
  • 240ml milk
  • 1 egg
  • 100g melted butter

Method

  • Mix the dry ingredients together (including the rhubarb)
  • Mix the wet ingredients together (milk, egg and butter)
  • Add the wet to the dry and quickly stir together.
  • Spoon the mixture into your muffin cases – this makes 10 large muffins.
  • Cook for 20-25 minutes, 180c/350f/Gas 4 – the muffins should be turning golden brown on top.

They keep for a couple of days – or freeze them individually.

rhurbarb diced

Rhubarb Bites

The glut continues and I’m still playing with rhubarb.  These bites are very moreish with a texture of a soft flapjack – but without the added sugar.  I’ve made flapjacks in the past using raw rhubarb, which works very well but for these I stewed the rhubarb first and this brings a softer texture and helps to bind the oats without the need for too much oil.

I’ve been eating these for the past two days – they are also good with a bit of full fat Greek yoghurt on the side for dipping.

Rhubarb Bites

Rhubarb bites

  • 200g Rhubarb – chopped into chunks
  • Juice and rind of half a large orange – or a whole small one
  • 1 teaspoon of ground ginger
  • 2 teaspoons of brown sugar

Put all the above in a saucepan and bring to a simmer – simmer for around 4-5 minutes until it’s starting to go mushy. Leave to cool.

  • 200g oats
  • 100g dates – chopped
  • 50g pumpkin seeds
  • 25g hulled hemp seeds
  • 50g pecan nuts – chopped
  • 50g coconut oil – melted

Mix all the ingredients together and then stir in the stewed rhubarb.

Line a baking dish with baking paper and put the mixture into the dish and mould it into a 20cm x 20cm square (roughly speaking).  It takes a bit of squishing down with your hand and/or a wooden spoon.

Divide into 16 squares before putting in the oven – use a sharp knife to cut through the mixture but don’t separate the squares.

Cook at 160c/325F/Gas 3 – for 30 minutes.  It should start to look golden brown on the top.

Take out of the oven and run your knife along the cuts again – don’t try and separate or take out of the tin.  Leave to cool in the tin before removing.

They do last a couple of days in an airtight container – that’s if you can stop eating them.